The NET Alliance™ and Novartis Oncology continue their commitment to improving knowledge and management of neuroendocrine tumors, and empowering patients to be more informed advocates.

  • А
  • А
  • А

Talk with your doctors 

Be sure to ask your doctor about any words you do not understand. You will want to keep notes of your doctor's answers, too.

What words are used to describe neuroendocrine tumors?

NET stands for "neuroendocrine tumor." But you may hear different words being used to describe your neuroendocrine tumor. Your doctor may use some of the words below.

 

Words used to describe your NET

Benign and malignant

Not all tumors mean cancer. They can be benign or malignant.

Benign tumors are not considered cancer. They are generally harmless and slow growing. Benign tumors usually look like normal tissue and may not spread to nearby tissue.

Malignant tumors are considered cancer. They grow uncontrollably. Malignant tumors are different from surrounding tissue. They may invade nearby tissue or spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body.

Some NET may be benign while others are malignant. Regardless of growth rate (some tumors grow faster and some others may grow and spread at a slower rate), ALL NET have the potential to become malignant. Malignant neuroendocrine tumors are also known as neuroendocrine cancer.

Differentiation

Your doctor may view a sample of your neuroendocrine tumor under a microscope to see how serious it is. Differentiation describes how your tumor looks compared with the normal tissue around it.

If your NET is well differentiated, it may grow and spread very slowly.

If your NET is poorly differentiated, it often grows and spreads quickly.

Functional and nonfunctional NET

Functional and nonfunctional are words doctors use to describe whether or not NET release hormones.

Functional NET

Functional NET, or secretory tumors, make and release hormones.

Functional NET cause different symptoms depending on the hormones they release, or secrete. For example, a NET that releases too much serotonin may cause a set of symptoms called carcinoid syndrome.

Nonfunctional NET

Nonfunctional NET, or nonsecretory tumors, do not make or release hormones.

Nonfunctional NET may cause symptoms as they grow.

Talk with your doctors 

Be sure to ask your doctor about any words you do not understand. You will want to keep notes of your doctor's answers, too.